Records Management Essentials

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1.3. Duties of governmental entities

The Public Records Management Act outlines the legal responsibilities of the chief administrative officer (CAO) and appointed records officers (ARO). The law does not identify specific job titles or positions for these individuals, but provides a description of the duties of each role.

Duties of a Chief Administrative Officer

A basic premise to sound records management is that within each organization, the chief administrative officer is responsible for the overall program. This is not a full-time position, but it is formally designated to someone in a senior-level position who has access to other senior executives and can ensure program implementation across the organization. The accountable senior executive oversees the records management program. The Public Records Management Act (Utah Code 63A-12-103) and the Government Records Management and Access Act (Utah Code 63G-2-401) specifically define the records keeping responsibilities of the chief administrative officer. Some of these responsibilities are:

Utah Code 63A-12-103 – Duties of governmental entities.
The chief administrative officer of each governmental entity shall:
(2) appoint one or more records officers who will be trained to work with the state archives in the care, maintenance, scheduling, disposal, classification, designation, access, and preservation of records;

 

Duties of Records Officers

The chief administrative officer needs help to carry out a records management program. Therefore, PRMA stipulates that he or she shall appoint one or more records officers who will be trained to work with the State Archives. The responsibilities of records officers are simply enumerated:

A chief administrative officer may appoint one or more records officers and may divide these responsibilities among them. The importance of teamwork between the chief administrative officer, the appointed records officers, and the State Archives, as well as legal counsel, IT, and other professionals cannot be overemphasized.